Research and Studies around the Subject of Rebounding

Warm-Ups Prevent Muscle Soreness
The National Institute of Health 27.03.2014
Here are two academic articles about delayed onset muscle soreness, or “DOMS.” Both are available from the National Institute of Health. Along with the information and links below, we’ve included quotations from each of their conclusions, which confirm the effectiveness of warming-up before exercise to prevent DOMS
The Importance of Warming-Up and Cooling-Down
The American Heart Association 27.03.2014
The following quote, part of which is used on our page about relaxation, is from the American Heart Association. The AHA website provides a wealth of information regarding health, exercise, nutrition and just about any other topic related to physical well being. It’s worth exploring.
A Compendium of Stretches from MIT
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 27.03.2014
It may seem strange that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an institution better known for number crunching than ab crunching, has put together such a nice, comprehensive outline of stretching techniques, but they have.
Active Stretching is Best After Warming Up
National Institute of Health 27.03.2014
The National Institute of Health summarized stretching activities in one sentence: “To avoid decrease in strength and performance that may occur in athletes due to static stretching before competition or activity, dynamic stretching is recommended for warm-up.” But what is the difference between "static" and "dynamic" stretching, and does it matter?
Active Stretching is Best After Warming Up
National Institute of Health 27.03.2014
The National Institute of Health summarized stretching activities in one sentence: “To avoid decrease in strength and performance that may occur in athletes due to static stretching before competition or activity, dynamic stretching is recommended for warm-up.” But what is the difference between "static" and "dynamic" stretching, and does it matter?